Life at Eclipse

Musings on the Eclipse Foundation, the community and the ecosystem

Eclipse Che 7 Enables Faster, Safer Development on Kubernetes

A major version release within the Eclipse Foundation community always provides us a reason to celebrate, congratulate, and thank all those who participated and contributed to the process. The delivery today of Eclipse Che 7 is no exception. But Che 7’s arrival is more than great news for the Eclipse community, it’s also an industry game changer because it drastically reduces the learning and adoption curves of Kubernetes for enterprise application developers.

Che 7 is the result of more than six years of collaboration and community contributions, including more than 20 vendors. It’s the world’s first Kubernetes-native IDE that has been built from the ground up specifically to enable developers to build cloud native applications. Fundamentally, Che 7 makes the developer and production environments the same on a scalable, collaborative, and secure platform specifically designed for building containerized applications. That platform addresses the major challenges developers face when working with Kubernetes.

While Kubernetes does a fantastic job of operating applications at scale, it’s a complex system that most developers do not yet fully understand. With Che 7, the workspace configuration complexities and challenges developers face with Kubernetes have been eliminated. The platform can be deployed on a public Kubernetes cluster or an on-premises data center. Once deployed, it provides centrally hosted private developer workspaces that make projects easy to share and easy to manage, but with enterprise-grade security.

Che 7 takes care of the “Kubernetization” of the development environment and the applications that a developer is building. It comes with a pre-packaged web-based IDE, based on an extended version of Eclipse Theia to provide an in-browser Visual Studio Code experience. The fully integrated environment containerizes everything a developer needs to develop, build, run, test, and debug enterprise cloud native applications. This includes all of the tools and dependencies. This a big deal considering many enterprises cite a lack of integration of development tools and processes as a primary challenge of container adoption.

The introduction of Che 7 represents another milestone in enterprise-grade, cloud native tooling innovation from the Eclipse Foundation and our community. It continues the Eclipse Foundation track record of delivering innovative tools to the development community, most notably through the Eclipse desktop IDE. Che is already integral to cloud native solutions from our vendor community, including Google, IBM, and Broadcom. It also comprises the core of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a new development environment for Red Hat OpenShift.

As we move forward, our community will continue to deliver more innovation through the Eclipse Cloud Development (ECD) Tools Working Group. In addition to Che, the ECD WG encompasses a broad portfolio of open source cloud development projects including Theia, Eclipse CodeWind, Eclipse Dirigible, Eclipse Sprotty, Eclipse Orion, and many more. The ECD WG will drive the evolution and adoption of de facto standards for cloud development tools, including language support, extensions, and developer workspace definitions.

Of course, Che 7 and the ECD WG are made possible by our development community. So, I thank all of those who have participated to date and encourage everyone to take part in the innovation process. To that end, we are actively recruiting members to the Eclipse Cloud Development Working group and we encourage and welcome new members.

Get started with Che 7 on any Kubernetes cluster at https://www.eclipse.org/che/ or learn more about getting started with Che at https://www.eclipse.org/che/getting-started/. To get involved with the Che community and contribute to the project, visit: https://github.com/eclipse/che/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md

 

Written by Mike Milinkovich

September 17, 2019 at 10:00 am

Posted in Foundation, Open Source

Welcome to the Future of Cloud Native Java

Today, with the release of Jakarta EE 8, we’ve entered a new era in Java innovation.

Under an open, vendor-neutral process, a diverse community of the world’s leading Java organizations, hundreds of dedicated developers, and Eclipse Foundation staff have delivered the Jakarta EE 8 Full Platform, Web Profiles, and related TCKs, as well as Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 certified as a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation.

To say this a big deal is an understatement. With 18 different member organizations, over 160 new committers, 43 projects, and a codebase of over 61 million lines of code in 129 Git repositories, this was truly a massive undertaking — even by the Eclipse community’s standards. There are far too many people to thank individually here, so I’ll say many thanks to everyone in the Jakarta EE community who played a role in achieving this industry milestone.

Here are some of the reasons I’m so excited about this release.

For more than two decades, Java EE has been the platform of choice across industries for developing and running enterprise applications. According to IDC, 90 percent of Fortune 500 companies rely on Java for mission-critical workloads. Jakarta EE 8 gives software vendors, more than 10 million Java developers, and thousands of enterprises the foundation they need to migrate Java EE applications and workloads to a standards-based, vendor-neutral, open source enterprise Java stack.

As a result of the tireless efforts of the Jakarta EE Working Group’s Specification Committee, specification development follows the Jakarta EE Specification Process and Eclipse Development Process, which are open, community-driven successors to the Java Community Process (JCP) for Java EE. This makes for a fully open, collaborative approach to generating specifications, with every decision made by the community — collectively. Combined with open source TCKs and an open process of self-certification, Jakarta EE significantly lowers the barriers to entry and participation for independent implementations.

The Jakarta EE 8 specifications are fully compatible with Java EE 8 specifications and include the same APIs and Javadoc using the same programming model developers have been using for years. The Jakarta EE 8 TCKs are based on and fully compatible with Java EE 8 TCKs. That means enterprise customers will be able to migrate to Jakarta EE 8 without any changes to Java EE 8 applications.

In addition to GlassFish 5.1 (which you can download here), IBM’s Open Liberty server runtime has also been certified as a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation. All of the vendors in the Jakarta EE Working Group plan to certify that their Java EE 8 implementations are compatible with Jakarta EE 8.

 All of this represents an unprecedented opportunity for Java stakeholders to participate in advancing Jakarta EE to meet the modern enterprise’s need for cloud-based applications that resolve key business challenges. The community now has an open source baseline that enables the migration of proven Java technologies to a world of containers, microservices, Kubernetes, service mesh, and other cloud native technologies that have been adopted by enterprises over the last few years.

As part of the call to action, we’re actively seeking new members for the Jakarta EE Working Group. I encourage everyone to explore the benefits and advantages of membership. If Java is important to your business, and you want to ensure the innovation, growth, and sustainability of Jakarta EE within a well-governed, vendor-neutral ecosystem that benefits everyone, now is the time to get involved.

Also, if you’re interested in learning more about our community’s perspective on what cloud native Java is, why it matters so much to many enterprises, and where Jakarta EE technologies are headed, download our new free eBook, Fulfilling the Vision for Open Source, Cloud Native Java. Thank you to Adam Bien, Sebastian Daschner, Josh Juneau, Mark Little, and Reza Rahman for contributing their insights and expertise to the eBook.

Finally, if you’ll be at Oracle Code One at the Moscone Center in San Francisco next week, be sure to stop by booth #3228, where the Eclipse community will be showcasing Jakarta EE 8, GlassFish 5.1, Eclipse MicroProfile, Eclipse Che, and more of our portfolio of cloud native Java open source projects.

 

Written by Mike Milinkovich

September 10, 2019 at 7:00 am

Industrial-Scale Collaboration for the Business Win

Marc Andreessen once famously said, “Software is eating the world.” He was right, software gobbled up industry sectors as varied as financial services, automotive, mining, healthcare, and entertainment. Companies of all sizes have leveraged software to improve their business processes and adapt products to a digital economy. And then a funny thing happened: open source ate software.

From startups to the world’s large corporations, commercial software is built on and with open source. In fact, open source now comprises 80 to 90 percent of the code in a typical software application. Today, most companies ship commercial products based on open source. If software is the engine of industrial-scale digital transformation, open source is the rocket fuel.

The fact is, no single company can compete with the rate and scale of disruptive innovation delivered by diverse open source communities. Not only has open source proven to be the most viable way of delivering complex platform software, but open source tenets like transparency, community-focus, inclusion, and collaboration have been adopted by organizations for building customer-centric strategies and cultures. According to research from Harvard Business School, firms contributing to open source see as much as 100 percent of a productivity boost.

Nowadays, organizations collaborate at open source foundations to gain a competitive edge. Industry leaders leverage participation in open source foundations to accelerate the market adoption of technologies, improve time to market, and achieve superior interoperability. At the Eclipse Foundation over the last 15 years, industry leaders like Bosch, Broadcom, Fujitsu, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Red Hat, SAP, and hundreds more have collaborated under the Eclipse governance model to drive shared innovation and create value within a sustainable ecosystem.

Today, we are thrilled to release the Business of Open Source eBook focused on how successful entrepreneurs are leveraging all that open source has to offer to drive digital disruption within business-friendly open source foundations like the Eclipse Foundation. We call this class of innovators entr<open>eurs.

Entr<open>eurs understand the value of open source participation to develop products faster, mitigate risk, and recruit talent to gain a competitive edge. They fundamentally recognize the role of vendor-neutral, community-driven, and commercially-friendly open source foundations like ours to foster industry-scale collaboration, anti-trust compliance, IP cleanliness, and ecosystem development and sustainability.

As Todd Moore, IBM’s Vice President of Open Technology, explains in the eBook, “being a disruptor generally means that you have to move very quickly. You don’t develop all of the technologies that you’re employing. You’ve got enough mastery over them to quickly be able to assemble them. You’re using automation and deployment strategies that allow you to rapidly cycle through the code. What you start with and what you end up with at the end of the string can radically change.”

Download the Business of Open Source eBook today to learn how to innovate with confidence by giving your mission-critical projects a proper home at the Eclipse Foundation. Thank you to Deborah Bryant, Todd Moore, and Tyler Jewell for contributing their insights and expertise to the eBook. Let us know what you think and be sure to join the entrepreneurial open source conversation on Twitter @EclipseFdn and share your open source success story using #entropeneur.

To learn more about the business value of open collaboration at the Eclipse Foundation, visit entropeneur.org to explore our other commercial open source resources, including video success stories featuring Eclipse community members. We’ve also developed an infographic summarizing the benefits and advantages of participating in an open source foundation, and slide deck that you can use to make the case for joining the Eclipse Foundation.

Written by Mike Milinkovich

July 15, 2019 at 10:40 am

Posted in Foundation

Eclipse ioFog: Evolving Toward Native Kubernetes Orchestration at the Edge

With the proliferation of AI, autonomous vehicles, 5G, IoT, and other industrial use cases that require lightning-fast data processing, edge computing has emerged over the past few years as a way to address the limitations of existing cloud architectures to process information and deliver services at the “IoT edge”. Instead of backhauling data to the centralized cloud, edge computing brings computational power closer to data sources to support near real-time insights and local actions while reducing network bandwidth and storage requirements.

According to Gartner, 75% of enterprise-generated data will be created and processed outside a traditional centralized data center or cloud by 2025. While the problems at the IoT edge — connectivity, manageability, scalability, reliability, security — are being solved as point solutions by enterprises and ecosystem players, there is a need for a foundational industry-wide standard for managing distributed IoT workloads. Time and again, open source has been proven to be the best way to deliver complex platform software with industrial scale collaboration.

Enter Kubernetes, the de facto standard for orchestrating containers and the applications running inside them. Kubernetes has massive potential for handling IoT workloads on the edge by providing a common control plane across hybrid cloud and edge environments to simplify management and operations. Within the Kubernetes IoT Edge Working Group, members of the Kubernetes and Eclipse communities are collaborating with leading technology innovators to extend Kubernetes to support dynamically, securely, and remotely managing edge nodes.

A great example of this collaboration is Eclipse ioFog, a universal Edge Compute Platform which offers a standardized way to develop and remotely deploy secure microservices to edge computing devices. ioFog can be installed on any hardware running Linux and provides a universal runtime for microservices to dynamically run on the edge. Companies in different vertical markets such as retail, automotive, oil and gas, telco, and healthcare are using ioFog to turn any compute device into an edge software platform.

The Eclipse Foundation is excited to support today’s announcement of the initial availability of ioFog features that make any Kubernetes distribution edge-aware. With this latest release, developers are able to extend Kubernetes to easily deploy, secure, and manage edge computing networks supporting applications such as advanced AI and machine learning algorithms.

Farah Papaioannou, co-founder and president of Edgeworx, explains the significance of the release this way:

“ioFog is a proven platform at the edge. With this release, we build on native Kubernetes, seamlessly extending it to the edge…We do this based on things that actually matter at the edge, such as latency, location or resources. We are delivering today a full cloud-to-edge solution, that’s 100-percent open source and works with any Kubernetes flavors and distros.”

These native Kubernetes enhancements are in the process of being contributed to the Eclipse ioFog open source project. We are proud to support the collective efforts of the Eclipse community and the Kubernetes ecosystem to help developers deploy, manage, and orchestrate applications and microservices from cloud to edge in a simple and secure manner.

For more information about ioFog, get started by using this link to install and set up your production ioFog environment. If you have questions or want to connect with other people involved in this platform, join the ioFog community and the mailing list.

Written by Mike Milinkovich

June 23, 2019 at 4:46 pm

Posted in Foundation, Open Source

The Cloud Native Imperative — Results from the 2019 Jakarta EE Developer Survey

The results of the 2019 Jakarta EE Developer Survey are out. Almost 1,800 Java developers from around the world have spoken. Taken together with the engagement and response to my recent posts on the future of Jakarta EE (see my latest blog here), the survey makes clear the developer community is focused on charting a new course for a cloud native future, beginning with delivering Jakarta EE 8. The Java ecosystem has a strong desire to see Jakarta EE, as the successor to Java EE, continue to evolve to support microservices, containers, and multi-cloud portability.

Organized by the Jakarta EE Working Group, the survey was conducted over three weeks in March 2019. Just like last year (see the 2018 results here), Jakarta EE member companies promoted the survey in partnership with the London Java Community, Java User Groups, and other community stakeholders. Thank you to everyone who took the time to participate. Access the full findings of the survey here.

Some of the highlights from this year’s survey include:

  • The top three community priorities for Jakarta EE are: better support for microservices, native integration with Kubernetes (tied at 61 percent), followed by production quality reference implementations (37 percent). To move mission-critical Java EE applications and workloads to the cloud, developers will need specifications, tools, and products backed by a diverse vendor community. Jakarta EE Working Group members have committed to deliver multiple compatible implementations of the Jakarta EE 8 Platform when the Jakarta EE 8 specifications are released.
  • With a third of developers reporting they are currently building cloud native architectures and another 30 percent planning to within the next year, cloud native is critically important today and will continue to be so;
  • The number of Java applications running in the cloud is projected to substantially increase, with 32 percent of respondents expecting that they will be running nearly two-thirds of their Java applications in the cloud within the next two years;
  • Microservices dominates as the architecture approach to implementing Java in the cloud, according to 43 percent of respondents;
  • Spring/Spring Boot again leads as the framework chosen by most developers for building cloud native applications in Java;
  • Eclipse Microprofile’s adoption has surged, with usage growing from 13 percent in 2018 to 28 percent today;
  • Java continues to dominate when it comes to deploying applications in production environments. It comes as no surprise that most companies are committed to protecting their past strategic investments in Java.

Once again, thanks to everyone who completed the survey and to the community members for their help with the promotion.

Let me know what you think about this year’s survey findings. We are open to suggestions on how we can improve the survey in the future, so please feel free to share your feedback.

Written by Mike Milinkovich

May 10, 2019 at 11:17 am

Posted in Foundation, Jakarta EE